Ben’s new Munromobile #A Tanka

Thank you so much for coming to visit a dog poet. My poems for Colleen’s weekly poetry challenge are a take on life from a canine perspective. We poets – and to date I seem to be the only dog poet –  write one of the structured poems permitted and have to integrate, as synonyms, the two words given as a prompt.

This week the word are spring and sing; I am doing a Tanka.

You can find out about it all, and have a go yourself, by clicking below:

Colleen’s poetry challenge

 

Photo of Ben's van no available in this format.

Last week I had to relinquish my van, which had been our friend, transport and accommodation, as we climbed the first 50 mountains on our quest to conquer the 282 Munros in Scotland; they are the mountains over 3000 feet. While I had grown to love the character of my van it seems that’s it’s unreliability was a bit of a liability. I had very mixed feelings about this transformation and wrote about then in this blog:

Ben’s new Munromobile

You can read all about our v. v. v big challenge here. Ben’s adventure

However, look at what I’ve got now and, of course, I had to write a poem about it.

 

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Bought near Pentland hills –
My rising star, shinning bright –
Tanka-Kangoo beams.
Like the promise of sunset
Or a boyant, joyous song.

Love Ben, the dog poet xx

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sensational

Oh golly gosh,

Thank you so much for coming to visit a dog poet. My poems for Colleen’s weekly poetry challenge are a take on life from a canine perspective. We poets – to date I seem to be the only dog poet –  write one of the structured poems permitted and have to integrate, as synonyms, the two words given as a prompt. Though, for the first poem of each month, we can choose our own words. This week I have chosen the words scent and sad and I am doing a short Haibun , followed by a Tanka. The Haibun is a piece of prose, with a title, written in the first person canine singular, and it occurs in the present moment. The poem that follows – never seeks to repeat, quote from or explain the prose. It should reflect some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail – seemingly different, yet somehow connected; gosh!

To be honest, I’m not sure I’ve captured all that but, then again, I’m only a dog and I’ve done my best for my first attempt. The Tanka that follows is structured in 5 lines, with a syllable count of 5, 7, 5, 7, 7. I’m pretty sure I’ve managed that, which isn’t bad for a dog, even a dog poet.

You can find out about it all and, have a go yourself. by clicking below:

Colleen’s poetry challenge

Sensational

sensational

She entered my life as a burst of starlight on a winter’s night, igniting my senses. The sky is now bluer and mown grass more fragrant, while autumn leaves laugh and crackle under foot. Our walks in the forest inject my heart with joy and – with soft steps – I dance, trying to catch moving shadows on the path. Here, verdant trees – swaying in the breeze – filter sunlight.

When she goes away, as she sometimes has to, a despondency numbs my senses and then a grey mantilla shrouds my life. I am reminded of lines from the poet, Yevtushenko:
“ The colours in my eyes will fade, when your face sets.”

Though – of course – being a dog, my senses will be extinguished when her smell is gone.

Her smell fading now
Each moment a crying shame.
Disrupted, my world –
Like neglected flower heads –
Drooping, lifeless, sees no sun.

By Ben, the dog poet ©2019

Additionally, you can read all the poems from last week here: Tuesday poetry challenge recap

And, if you need a little bed time reading to send you to sleep, you can read lots of my poems ever, here: The dog poet’s poems

You can also read all about my big walking charity challenge here: Mucky Boots and Flawless Paws, but that might keep you awake at night, or possibly give you nightmares – hee, hee!

Love Ben xx 0

Ben’s weekly poetry, #Haiku

Gosh, thank you so much for visiting my blog.

This post is for my main man – David 😊😊😊

My poem is in response to Colleen’s weekly poetry challenge. We poets, even dog poets, write a structured poem containing synonyms of two words prompts which Colleen usually provides (Click here for the guidelines). However, for the first poem of each month we select our own words. This week I am using the words rock and roll. I’ve chosen them for two reasons. Firstly, because I’m in a good mood. My male person came home from hospital on Wednesday and we are a complete unit again. I like to do a bit of dancing about when I’m happy. Then, when I went outside today I saw our Willow tree rocking and rolling in the stormy winds at our house; they were awful. When I tried to play ball, I had no way of knowing where my ball was going to end up. I got v. v. v dizzy 😓

This is my Haiku, I so hope you like it.

one-man-and-his-dog-willow-sculpture
One man and his dog, reproduced by kind permission of  willow sculptor Caroline Gregson.

Link to Caroline’s work

Watch the willow bend
Swaying arcs in reeling wind
Supple fronds for art

By Ben, the dog poet ❤ 🐾 xx © 2018

 

 

Homeless in 2018 #Tanka poem

Thank you so much for coming to visit a dog poet. My poems for Colleen’s weekly poetry challenge are a take on life from a canine perspective. This weeks challenge asks us to use the words cold and safe as synonyms, in our poems. Wow (woof oh woof) what thought provoking words!

I can’t wait to get to Christmas and tear my presents open and I have been getting SO excited but… these these words made me think about others not so fortunate.

Homeless in 2018

homeless man & dog

December hardens
Unforgiving frozen slabs
Beneath cobalt skies.
Life spirals – reaching for hope
Your puppy face my harbour

By Ben, the dog poet © 2018 🐾

 

Halloween

Thank you for coming to visit my blog and read my poetry. This is my response to Colleen’s weekly poetry challenge. This week the two words to be used as synonyms are afraid and grave.

 

 

Restless spirits creep
Canines, wired to the moon,
Seriously spooked

By Ben, the dog poet © 2018

 

Scroll down here to see what all the other poets got up to last week.

 

 

Spooky tales from Dartmoor

Thank you for coming to visit my blog at Halloween, when the spirits roam the earth. This is my response to Colleen’s weekly poetry challenge. This week the two words to be used as synonyms are haunt and spell.

Here is my spooky tale from the remote heart of Dartmoor, in South West England, famous for it’s bog and cloying fog. All is not what it seems and one of my com-patriarchs comes a cropper, quite unnecessarily as it turns out.

The whole terrifying saga

This is my very first Etheree poem and I’ve made it a double!!

download

Mist
Swirling
Cauldron’s brew
The grimpen mire’s
Notorious swamp
Mysteriously claims
Aristocratic body.
Legend triumphs over logic
An Ancient curse surpasses reason
A supernatural beast prowls and growls.

Deerstalker and pipe fearless on the moor
Holmes, scrutinising supposition,
Exposes a greedy cancer
Devouring the very soul
And house of Baskerville.
Dressed up for witchcraft
Bloodhound frightens
Canine fate
– Poor boy –
SHOT! 😦

Ben, the dog poet © 2018

This is what all the other poets got up to last week

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mountain Rescue

Thank you very much for visiting my blog. This is my response to Colleen’s weekly poetry challenge.  The two prompt words, to be included but used synonymously, are Ghost and Hollow.

My poem this week is about how I felt when 32 imposing bi peds came, in a never ending torrent, over the mountain ahead of me. My people seemed to think they were the best thing since sliced bread (if you like that sort of thing) but, to me, they were terrifying aliens invading my already anxious space. I was so confused. One minute we were having a lovely mountain walk and the next my male person was on the ground and there was some sort of commotion and then a v. v. v long wait. I was getting very nervous because I didn’t have a clue what was going on. Why weren’t we walking on and on to the top. Who were these people, carrying on with those things they attach to their ears, and why was my person all wrapped up and looking sad. What in heavens name was that thunderous noise coming from the sky.

http://mountainrescue.org.uk/incident?jobno=2018_069

 

 

Spooked, scared, defensive.
Ghouls in black and red attend
My crevice d person

     By Ben, the dog poet © 2018

NB I’d better report that my person will be OK in a few months. I’m not so sure about me.

Here is what all Colleen’s other poets got up to last week

Love Ben xx